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Cancer Links and Resources

Below are list and links to some of the most common childhood cancers. The information below is coming from the National Cancer Institute Data base. These are only for reference and education only, not for diagnose. Please consult your medial physician for more information and treatments.

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many immature lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell). Family history and being exposed to radiation may affect the risk of developing childhood ALL. Possible signs of childhood ALL include fever and bruising. Tests that examine the blood and bone marrow are used to detect (find) and diagnose childhood ALL. Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Read More > 

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many immature lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell). Family history and being exposed to radiation may affect the risk of developing childhood ALL. Possible signs of childhood ALL include fever and bruising. Tests that examine the blood and bone marrow are used to detect (find) and diagnose childhood ALL. Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Read More >

Astrocytomas, Childhood (Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors)

A childhood brain or spinal cord tumor is a disease in which abnormal cells form in the tissues of the brain or spinal cord. The brain controls many important body functions. The spinal cord connects the brain with nerves in most parts of the body. Brain and spinal cord tumors are a common type of childhood cancer. Read More >

Bone Cancer

Primary bone cancer is cancer that forms in cells of the bone. Some types of primary bone cancer are osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and chondrosarcoma. Secondary bone cancer is cancer that spreads to the bone from another part of the body (such as the prostate, breast, or lung). Read More >

Cervical Cancer

Cancer that forms in tissues of the cervix (the organ connecting the uterus and vagina). It is usually a slow-growing cancer that may not have symptoms but can be found with regular Pap tests (a procedure in which cells are scraped from the cervix and looked at under a microscope). Cervical cancer is almost always caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Read More >

Hairy Cell Leukemia

Cancer that starts in blood-forming tissue such as the bone marrow and causes large numbers of blood cells to be produced and enter the bloodstream. Read More >

Head and Neck Cancer

Cancer that arises in the head or neck region (in the nasal cavity, sinuses, lips, mouth, salivary glands, throat, or larynx [voice box]). Read More > 

Hodgkin Lymphoma

Childhood Hodgkin lymphoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the lymph system. There are two types of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma. Epstein-Barr virus infection can affect the risk of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma. Possible signs of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma include swollen lymph nodes, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. Tests that examine the lymph system are used to detect (find) and diagnose childhood Hodgkin lymphoma. Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Read More >

Kidney (Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors)

A disease in which malignant (cancer) cells are found in the kidney, and may spread to the lungs, liver, or nearby lymph nodes. Wilms tumor usually occurs in children younger than 5 years old. Read More > 

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Any of a large group of cancers of lymphocytes (white blood cells). Non-Hodgkin lymphomas can occur at any age and are often marked by lymph nodes that are larger than normal, fever, and weight loss. There are many different types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. These types can be divided into aggressive (fast-growing) and indolent (slow-growing) types, and they can be formed from either B-cells or T-cells. B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas include Burkitt lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, immunoblastic large cell lymphoma, precursor B-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma.  Read More >

Ovarian Cancer

Cancer that forms in tissues of the ovary (one of a pair of female reproductive glands in which the ova, or eggs, are formed). Most ovarian cancers are either ovarian epithelial carcinomas (cancer that begins in the cells on the surface of the ovary) or malignant germ cell tumors (cancer that begins in egg cells). Read More > 

Rhabdomyosarcoma, Childhood

Cancer that forms in the soft tissues in a type of muscle called striated muscle. Rhabdomyosarcoma can occur anywhere in the body. Read More > 

Testicular Cancer

Cancer that forms in tissues of one or both testicles. Testicular cancer is most common in young or middle-aged men. Most testicular cancers begin in germ cells (cells that make sperm) and are called testicular germ cell tumors. Read More >

Unknown Primary, Carcinoma of Childhood

A case in which cancer cells are found in the body, but the place where the cells first started growing (the origin or primary site) cannot be determined. Also called cancer of unknown primary origin and CUP. Read More >